Thursday, 16 April 2009

My search for a hill station continues. In the meantime, the Snail Shell crumbles and splinters around me. But I'm not the only one with house maintenance problems.
We shared a late breakfast of tea and teacakes with Barry, Gerald and his wife in the kitchen up at the farmhouse, an old wooden homestead now leaning at a precarious angle at one end. Its wooden piers were sinking unevenly into the ground. Every now and then, said Barry, there was a loud report like a gun as one of the roof spars or a structural beam sprang clear of its fixings and poked through the outside wall like a broken collarbone. They then had to jack up the house four inches at a time, straighten it up and ease it back on to supporting chocks. The little homestead was on the move, inching crabwise across the Pilliga.
Roger Deakin, Wildwood

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Title for this?

Deakin's enviro/travelogue format is really compelling for field-trippers, yes?
I liked the way he paid tribute to Rolls for 'A Million Wild Acres' being a strong influence on his own thought; reading the landscape like a palimpsest.
Considering the previous popular Deakin, I wondered whether the publishers played with 'wood log', 'tree log' or maybe even 'log log' as their in-house title.

Completely OT - check out the Pharyngula threadfest here
http://scienceblogs.com/pharyngula/2009/04/basics_imprinting.php
My daughter tells me this is exactly how genetics lectures and tuts get into high gear; genetics and big swinging d-cks apparently are attracted to each other.
I am enjoying the lecture immensely.

Anonymous said...

above comment from

d

My excuse for infecting the world of Snailseyeview for a few days?
Minding a littlie after a big operation while all the womens are out making the dough to pay for it all.
This is the rightful place of the mens - reclining lazily in front of a warm entertainment machine.

d

Anonymous said...

That pharyngula link didn't wrap into the comment by the looks of it.
Try this tiny url
http://tinyurl.com/ckmodq

d

Snail said...

It certainly is compelling, D. It's one of those books to dip into, savouring the details and his sometimes eccentric (in a good way) view of matters. I'm with him in Kazahstan at the moment, tracing the ancestry of the apple.

And at Pharyngula, I really enjoy PZ's science posts. Am still getting to grips with the one about snails and nodal. For the past decade, I've had offices next to top-notch genetics lecturers, who have been more than willing to bring me up to speed on this stuff. Now I have to fend for myself! (Well, sort of.)

You sound like you're having fun at home.

Anonymous said...

Left the house?!

About time :-)
You can drop the worst of them in it now ;-)
Only if you really need to, of course.

Tip: If you have to store books before moving to your hill station, store them in a southern depot, rather than coastal northern ones; I swear I can see the fungus moving through Q in satellite view.

But I suppose you know that already.

Check the voice out. Piaf lives!
Southern England? Home of the terminally prejudiced.
pwnd!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9lp0IWv8QZY

d