Monday, 6 July 2009

Bridled honeyeater (Lichenostomus frenatus)

A lifer for me. Since spotting one in my garden last week, I've seen them everywhere. They've very active birds — one bird guide describes them as 'bustling' — and are reluctant to pose for a photograph. My normal view is a glimpse of natty two-tone beak and blue eyes through the scrub, so I was delighted to get these photos.

The species is a Wet Tropics endemic, living in upland rainforest and associated vegetation between Townsville and Cooktown. It is closely related to the Eungella honeyeater.

Standard view of a bridled honeyeater


A moment of quiet ...

... while deciding where to go next

8 comments:

mick said...

It's worth waiting for photos with beautiful blue eyes like that!

Denis Wilson said...

Hi Snail, you can see that Mick is a romantic at heart.
I just want to suggest that this will be the first of many "lifers" for you.
Cheers
Denis

Snail said...

They are such lovely eyes, Mick!

Denis, I'm hoping I'll be seeing quite a range of animals. Yesterday a tree kangaroo and today I saw something that looked like a green possum (but I can't say for sure).

Gouldiae said...

G'day Bronwen,
Bewdy! Always nice to get a 'lifer'. By the looks of the distribution map in my guide, it has a pretty restricted range. I guess frenatus is for frenetic or frantic.
Love those eyes.
Gouldiae

Snail said...

Gouldiae, they tag team with the Lewin's honeyeaters, which are equally frantic. Apparently, there are plenty of Macleay's honeyeaters around here too but I haven't seen any yet. Early days ...

Tyto Tony said...

Good to reveal a passion for Bridleds rather than unbridled passions. Am I the only one who doesn't see much similarity with Eungellas?

Your green possum may have been showing the same fur-tip colour camouflage I've seen on tree kangaroos.

Dave Coulter said...

Nice shot :)

Snail said...

Thanks, Dave :) They've disappeared for the moment and the Macleay's honeyeaters have moved in. It's all happening here.

Oh, Tony! That was truly ... Damn! I wish I'd thought of it. If I had decent internet access I'd see if I could find the paper(s) that examine the relationships between the Eungella and bridled honeyeaters. There's some sort of vague resemblance, I think --- when compared with other species in the genus. But I'm confused about bird systematics.