Friday, 22 January 2010

Two tree frogs



After several evenings listening to the frogs calling from somewhere deep in the undergrowth, I finally managed to get pictures of them. Because it's still raining heavily, I took these photos from the comfort of my living room. I've already been soaked through once today.

These orange-thighed tree frogs (Litoria xanthomera) sit in low vegetation at the edge of the rainforest and call only in heavy rain. The call is a series of loud quacking growls finished off with a brief bird-like trill. Until the mid-1980s, this species was considered to be a northern subspecies of the red-eyed tree frog (L. chloris), which occurs from mid-east Queensland to northern New South Wales.




14 comments:

Denis Wilson said...

Love the second close-up shot (where it is presumably calling).
Worth getting wet for.
.
Cheers
Denis

Snail said...

They're cuties. That second one was winding up to a call, but waiting for me to switch off the spotlight first. They blow up like balloons when they're in full cry.

Have just been trying to identify another little green frog, but it's a prodigious leaper. No luck yet getting a pic of it.

sarala said...

I love these photos! They are so cute. I miss seeing and hearing frogs. We've none around here that I know of. Of course I don't haunt the swamps of Chicago at night--probably haunted by other than frogs.

mick said...

Green tree frogs are beautiful! I must admit though that I prefer them out in the bush. Down in NSW I had some that used to regularly find their way inside the house. Lights out - a plop on the bed! - meant another one was inside!

Snail said...

Fortunately, these guys don't call all the time or I might have to invest in earplugs --- they are only 2 - 3 m from the window. The green-eyed tree frogs (L. genimaculata) do call persistently, but they make such a quiet unobtrusive tapping noise that it becomes background.

Sarala, I'm sure there are plenty around the swamps, but I can understand your reticence!

Mick, these fellows tend to keep to the outside, which is good. The green-eyed tree frogs come inside occasionally. (My neighbours have one resident in their bathroom.) I must say, I prefer them to the big green tree frogs that use guttering as an echo chamber to magnifying their calls. I haven't seen those here in the rainforest, but I wouldn't be surprised if they're around!

Russell Constable said...

Great photos and nice to see this frog as we don't get them here on the coast much, however we do get L. genimaculata with its gentle tok like call. Denis is right...worth getting wet for!

Snail said...

The genimacs were going wild last night --- a chorus of them making their little tokking noises --- but the xanthomeras were silent, for some reason.

Russell Constable said...

I breed frogs here as a hobby...well to be truthful I bred rainbowfish but for every single rainbowfish I breed in the outside 200 litre tanks I seem to produce at least 20 frogs ! I notice that the different frog species seem to take turns at being the dominant calling and breeding frog of the day so to speak. Lately it's been neck and neck between L. gracilenta and L. caerulea! Bass and treble!

Neil said...

Great photos good to have them around and it looks like you will be getting more rain so more frogs as well.

Sherryl said...

Great photos. I love frogs. Question: if I made a frog pond, would tree frogs be interested? We've found one or two little brown ones under bricks.
Would rather see them in the trees, but not likely where I am!

Snail said...

Russell, I've been thinking of getting some big ceramic bowls for the frogs to breed in. (Bowls that the cane toads can't get into, of course.) If I do get some, I'll make sure they're not right next to the house. It'd be nice to see the taddies.

Neil, I know there's a whole range of frogs here, including great big barred frogs in the leaf litter and those tiny rainforest toadlets, but I haven't seen them yet!

Sherryl, the frogs would certainly be interested --- and you wouldn't have to worry about cane toads. I don't think many of the frogs in your area are inclined to climb, although they are happy to do a bit of scrambling!

One species here (that I've yet to photograph) likes to climb windows, but is very skittish. Probably feels a tad exposed.

Dave Coulter said...

It's nice to see anything green when it's so grey and wintery around here :)

Snail said...

Dave, it can't be long until spring now, can it?

Everything is green here. Including one of the sofas, which has now been overwhelmed by mould.

Still, that's the downside of being in the middle of a rainforest!

Anonymous said...

Mould (and frogs) - something I know about. Clean off mould with dilute white vinegar solution. Then mix 10mls clove oil in half a litre of water - use a spray pack - kills the spores. Good preventative for pre wet-season. Leave ceiling fans on 24/7 during wet. No mould! Little leaper could be L.lesueri - but other possibilities - their call should give them away. W.