Thursday, 10 November 2011

Burny Bean II: The Opening

The burny bean flowers have opened. They don't last long. Still no sign of a pollinator. Will keep looking. (When I remember.)

8 comments:

Denis Wilson said...

Stunning shapes.
Nature does that kind of thing.
Surprisingly subdued colours, but charming.
Denis

wildwings said...

Hi Snail, The first time I saw this species was at Fog Dam in the NT and was lucky to catch it flowering. I was stunned at how impressive it looked even though the petals are predominantly green umoungst a sea of green. I guess it has to do with the shape and cluster. regards Allen

Calling Ravens said...

Although not original, my comment in sincere: Wow, oh Wow! That is a perfect shot. Can you imagine it blown up and on a canvas..that gorgeous green on a sea of that gorgeous blue.

Snail said...

It's simultaneously modest and stunning, isn't it? I love green flowers. If my next place is big enough for a garden, I'll plant a collection of green flowers. In Melbourne I had a few, but the only one I can recall is the Mt Buffalo mint bush Prostanthera monticola.

Anonymous said...

i remember seeing on a documentary that some pollinators see a different colour spectrum... maybe green isn't green to the ones that count?
anyone care to correct me?
kurt

Snail said...

Kurt, that's an excellent point and one that hadn't even crossed my mind.

Yes, some birds and insects have good UV vision and can detect signals that are invisible to us. The Mucuna flowers could be as bright as neon to potential pollinators.

Unfortunately, all the flowers are now past their prime, so I've missed the opportunity to get out there with a UV torch to check. I'll have to make a note for next year.

laurak@forestwalkart said...

wowwowwow. wow...is definitely an understatement...

that's beautiful!! geometric...wonderful shades of green...each petal looks hand-blown!

Snail said...

They would look spectacular in glass!

The shape of the flower (and the size) is almost Nepenthe like.

(I'd grown montane Nepenthes here, if I could keep the possums off them!)